Posts tagged ‘Amiri Baraka’

February 15, 2013

Arts in the Valley, Saturday (8 PM), and Sunday (2 PM), 1480 KYOS AM

by arthouseflower

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Tune into Arts in the Valley on Saturday, and Sunday, March 1 and 2 to listen to host Kim McMillon interview James Smethurst, associate professor of Afro-American studies at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, discuss his book The Black Arts Movement: Literary Nationalism in the 1960s and 1970s.

To Listen to James Smethurst’s interview, click onto the link:James-Smethurst-The-Black-Arts-Movement

James Smethurst

smethhurst
Emerging from a matrix of Old Left, black nationalist, and bohemian ideologies and institutions, African American artists and intellectuals in the 1960s coalesced to form the Black Arts Movement, the cultural wing of the Black Power Movement. In this comprehensive analysis, James Smethurst examines the formation of the Black Arts Movement and demonstrates how it deeply influenced the production and reception of literature and art in the United States through its negotiations of the ideological climate of the Cold War, decolonization, and the civil rights movement. Taking a regional approach, Smethurst examines variations in the character of the local expressions of the nascent Black Arts Movement, a movement distinctive in its geographical reach and diversity, while always keeping the frame of the larger movement in view. The Black Arts Movement, he argues, fundamentally changed American attitudes about the relationship between popular culture and “high” art and dramatically transformed the landscape of public funding for the arts

“A richly insightful and informative account of the often occluded racial dynamics of early modernism.”
–Journal of American Studies

“The most comprehensive work published to date on the Black Arts Movement, painstakingly detailing the movement’s national thrust. . . . This book is a monumental achievement and will serve as the definitive text on the movement for some time to come.”
–Journal of African American History

“Smethurst… has written a tour-de-force that will quickly become the definitive analysis of the sprawling and internally contradictory entity known as the Black Arts movement.”
–Against the Current

“Mapping important connections and offering a cornucopia of information, The Black Arts Movement: Literary Nationalism in the 1960s and 1970s is a truly valuable contribution to the study of American letters. Smethurst gets it right! His thorough research and astute analysis overcome two decades of deliberate critical misrepresentation to help us examine a tumultuous era when visionary leadership and nationwide grassroots participation created a dynamic, paradigm-changing cultural renaissance.”–Lorenzo Thomas, University of Houston-Downtown

About the Author
James Smethurst is associate professor of Afro-American studies at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He is the author of The New Red Negro: The Literary Left and African American Poetry, 1930-1946 and The Black Arts Movement: Literary Nationalism in the 1960s and 1970s, winner of the Organization of American Historians’ James A. Rawley Prize.

December 20, 2012

Arts in the Valley, Saturday, December 22, 2012, 1480 KYOS AM, 9 pm

by arthouseflower

 

Kim McMillon interviews author, poet, and activist Marvin X on the Black Arts Movement on Saturday, December 22nd at 9 pm on Arts in the Valley, 1480 KYOS AM in Merced, Ca.

 To listen to the interview with Marvin X, please click here:
About the Marvin X
Marvin X was born May 29, 1944, Fowler CA, nine miles south of Fresno in the central valley of California. In Fresno his parents published the Fresno Voice, a black newspaper.
Marvin attended Oakland’s Merritt College where he encountered fellow students how became Black Panther Party co-founders Bobby Seale and Huey Newton. They taught him black nationalism.  Marvin’s first play Flowers for the Trashman was produced by the Drama department at San Francisco State University, 1965.  Marvin X dropped out to established his own Black Arts West Theatre in the Fillmore, 1966, along with playwright Ed Bullins. Months later Marvin would co-found Black House with Eldridge Cleaver, 1967.
Marvin introduced  Eldridge Cleaver to Huey Newton and Bobby Seale.  Eldridge immediately joined the Black Panther Party.  Huey Newton said, “Marvin X was my teacher, many of our comrades came from his Black Arts Theatre: Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver,  Emory Douglas and Samuel Napier.”
One of the movers and shakers of the Black Arts Movement (BAM) Marvin X has published 30 books, including essays, poetry, and his autobiography Somethin’ Proper. Important books include Fly to Allah, poems, Beyond Religion, toward Spirituality, essays on consciousness, and How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy, a manual based on the 12 step Recovery model.
Marvin received his MA in English/Creative writing from San Francisco State University, 1975. He has taught at San Francisco State University, Fresno State University, UC Berkeley and San Diego, Mills College, Merritt and Laney Colleges in Oakland, University of Nevada, Reno.  He lectures coast to coast at such colleges and universities as University of Arkansas, University of Houston, Morehouse and Spelman, Atlanta, University of Virginia, Howard University, Univ. of Penn, Temple Univ., Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, UMASS, Boston.

His latest book is the Wisdom of Plato Negro, parables/fables, Black Bird Press, Berkeley. He currently teaches at his Academy of da Corner, 14th and Broadway, downtown Oakland. Ishmael Reed says, “Marvin X is Plato teaching on the streets of Oakland.”

For speaking, readings and performance, contact Marvin X @ jmarvinx@yahoo.com,
http://www.blackbirdpressnews.blogspot.com

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