Posts tagged ‘Chicano’

February 11, 2013

Arts in the Valley, February 9 & 10, 2013, 1480 KYOS, Merced, CA

by arthouseflower

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On Saturday, February 9, Arts in the Valley Host Kim McMillon will interview Poet Laureate of California Juan Felipe Herrera and award-winning musician and poet Avotcja. The show will air on 1480 KYOS AM at 8 pm on Saturday, and 2 pm on Sunday. You can also listen to the show on Arts in the Valley on Facebook.

To Listen to Juan Felip Herrera’s interview, click onto the link:juan-1

Juan Felipe Herrera is the author of twenty-eight books and currently serves as the Tomás Rivera Endowed Chair in the Department of Creative Writing at the University of California, Riverside. He was a professor and chair of Chicano and Latin American Studies at California State University, Fresno, from 1990 to 2004 and a teaching assistant fellow at the Iowa Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa from 1988 to 1990.

‘Herrera’s work has received wide critical acclaim including numerous national and international awards. In a 2008 review of his work, Stephen Burt of the New York Times wrote, “All life, all art, involves boundaries, if only those of birth and death. Some poets keep us conscious of those boundaries; others, like Herrera, discover their powers by defying them. Many poets since the 1960s have dreamed of a new hybrid art, part oral, part written, part English, part something else: an art grounded in ethnic identity, fueled by collective pride, yet irreducibly individual too. Many poets have tried to create such an art: Herrera is one of the first to succeed.”’

To listen to Avotcja, click onto the link:avotcha-1
Avotcja has been published in English & Spanish in the USA, Mexico & Europe, and in more Anthologies than she remembers. She is an award winning Poet & multi-instrumentalist who has opened for Betty Carter in New York City, Peru’s Susana Baca at San Francisco’s Encuentro Popular & Cuba’s Gema y Pável, played with Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Bobi & Luis Cespedes, John Handy, Sonido Afro Latina, Dimensions Dance Theater, Black Poets With Attitudes, Bombarengue, Nikki Giovanni, Los Angeles’ Build An Ark, Dwight Trible, Diamano Coura West African Dance Co., Terry Garthwaite, Big Black, The Bay Area Blues Society & Caribeana Etc.

Shared stages with Sonia Sanchez, Piri Thomas, Janice Mirikitani, Diane DiPrima, Michael Franti, Jayne Cortez, & with Jose Montoya’s Royal Chicano Air Force & is a Bay Area icon with her group Avotcja & Modúpue. She Avotcja was the opening act for the legendary Poet Pat Parker the last three years of her life. both composed & performed the film score for the Danish documentary MuNu. Her Poetry &/or music has been recorded by Piri Thomas, Famadou Don Moye (of The Art Ensemble Of Chicago), Bobby Matos Latin Jazz Ensemble, & performed by The Purple Moon Dance Project, and was the 1st Poetry performed by New York’s Dance Mobile. She’s appeared at The Lorraine Hansberry Theater in S. F., The Asian-American Jazz Festival in Chicago, as well as The Asian-American Jazz Festival in San Francisco.

December 12, 2010

December 11th Arts in the Valley, 1480 KYOS, 8 PM, PST

by arthouseflower

ARTSINVAL1211 Click onto this link to hear the December 11th Arts in the Valley

Staci Santa is the Executive Director of the Merced Arts Council, whose mission is to inspire and nurture the arts in Merced County. Incorporated in 1978, the Merced County Arts Council was originally operated from a small office space on Main Street. In 1996, the City of Merced entrusted the Arts Council to manage the Merced Multicultural Arts Center. In addition to operating this 28,000 sq. foot, multipurpose arts center, the Arts Council manages an arts-in-education program; an arts facility for adults with developmental disabilities; performances and visual/performing arts classes for children and adults; professional support for artists through fiscal sponsorship; exhibits of about 20 professional artists each year; and newfound coalitions for visual and performing artists.

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Francisco X. Alarcon, award winning Chicano poet and educator, is author of  twelve volumes of  poetry, including, From the Other Side of Night: Selected and New Poems (University of Arizona Press 2002), and Snake Poems: An Aztec Invocation (Chronicle Books 1992).

His  latest book is  Ce-Uno-One: Poems for the New Sun (Swan Scythe Press 2010). His book of  bilingual poetry for children, Animal Poems of the Iguazu (Children’s Book Press 2008), was selected as a Notable Book for a Global Society by the International Reading Association. His previous bilingual book  titled Poems to Dream Together (Lee & Low Books 2005) was awarded the 2006 Jane Addams Honor Book Award. He has been a finalist nominated for Poet Laureate of  California in two  occasions. He teaches at the University of California, Davis.

Whenever I say ‘Mexico’/I hear my grandma telling me/about the Aztecs and the city they built/on an island in the middle of a lake/’Mexico’ says my grandma/”means: from the bellybutton of the moon”/”don’t forget your origins my son”/maybe that’s why/whenever I now say “Mexico”/I feel like touching my bellybutton.

—Francisco Alarcon, Bellybutton of the Moon

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In 1990, Lucha Corpi was twice honored: she was awarded a Creative Arts Fellowship in fiction by the City of Oakland, and she was named poet laureate at Indian University Northwest.

The publication of Eulogy for a Brown Angel: A Mystery Novel (Arte Público Press, 1992) was the culmination of a life-long dream. The novel won the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award and the Multicultural Publishers Exchange Best Book of Fiction. Cactus Blood (Arte Público Press, 1995) is Corpi’s second mystery novel featuring Chicana detective Gloria Damasco. Hispanic culture, the United Farm Workers movement and other social issues texture a suspenseful search for a ritualistic assassin. The publication of Black Widow’s Wardrobe (Arte Público Press, 1999) rounded out the trilogy known as The Gloria Damasco Series.

“We Chicanos are like the abandoned children of divorced cultures. We are forever longing to be loved by an absent neglectful parent –Mexico-and also to be truly accepted by the other parent –the United States. We want bicultural harmony. We need it to survive. We struggle to achieve it. That struggle keeps us alive.”-Black Widow’s Wardrobe

 

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