Posts tagged ‘Staci Santa’

June 10, 2012

Arts in the Valley, Saturday (8 PM), June 9, and Sunday, June 10, 2012, 1480 KYOS AM, Merced, CA

by arthouseflower

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On Saturday and Sunday, June 9th and 10th, Arts in the Valley host Kim McMillon interviews the new Merced Arts Council executive director Laura Phillips, and former executive director Staci Santa.  Ms. McMillon will also interview author Bardi Rosman Koodrin, and festival director Lennie Dean, and director Linda L. Reid.

To listen to Laura Phillips and Staci Santa, click onto the link:stacy santa

The Merced County Arts Council Inc. has hired a new executive director Laura Phillips.   Staci Santa is departing the position to live in Tucson, Ariz. this June. Santa spent five years as director. She started working for the council through a grant-funded program director position in 2006. Santa has worked closely with the community to sustain the Merced Multicultural Arts Center, which is managed by the council, and to develop programs for the community.

Santa organized a curatorial committee of local artists and experts who jury the art exhibits at the Arts Center throughout the year. She led the organization through the financial crisis, wrote many successful grant proposals and worked with local artists, performing arts groups, schools and governmental agencies to help the Merced arts scene thrive.  For more information on the Merced County Arts Council, please visit http://www.artsMerced.org.

To listen to Bardi Rosman Koodrin, click onto link:san mateo fair

The Literary Director of the Fine Arts Galleria since 2009, Bardi Rosman Koodrin, MA originated the concept of “Events within the Event” for writers to give free workshops and readings to fairgoers.  There is also an annual Author Book Day with over 20 local authors promoting their work.  In conjunction with the fair, Notre Dame De Namur University www.ndnu.edu offers a contest with a $20,000 Creative Writing Scholarship for a deserving high school student.

An exciting new addition is the Sand Hill Review Press publication of Carry the Light, a 300 page anthology of stories, poems, and essays in which each entrant has at least one piece published. sandhillreviewpress.com This published collection of contest submissions appears to be the first of its kind for a county fair, and will be available on Amazon.com.

Carry the Light, San Mateo County Fair’s literary anthology 2012 book, continues the progressive outreach of the Fair with the publishing of all accepted literary entries by the Sand Hill Review Press (www.sandhillreviewpress.com) via Amazon.com.

Carry the Light, a 300-page anthology, includes short stories, poetry and personal essays that tell compelling stories. All were collected during the pre-fair entry period using the Fair’s high criteria for excellence. It is widely believed that this is the first anthology of its kind to be accepted for sale at Amazon.

Capitalizing on the thirst for the written word in the Peninsula and Bay Area, the San Mateo County Fair is offering a wide variety of free “events within the event” writing workshops, panels, short plays, presentations, author interviews, readings, book-signings, and even songs of the sea on their literary stage.

To commemorate the book, the Fair is hosting an autograph party on Sunday, June 10, at 4:30 pm in the Fine Arts Galleria in Expo Hall where published authors will be on hand to sign books and discuss their works.

About The San Mateo County Fair 

The San Mateo County Fair “Where Tradition Meets Innovation” boasts a stunning variety of world class musical entertainment, live performances, fun festival food, local and traditional contests, and a “Ferris Wheeling” carnival. The fair lasts nine days and will be attended by over 150,000 guests.

“We are excited to offer these headline acts and know that the line-up puts us at the top of the entertainment spectrum for the entire region,” says Chris Carpenter, San Mateo Event Center General Manager. “There is music for just about everyone at the Fair –Top 40, Rock and Roll, Rhythm and Blues and much more.”

­­­­­­­­­­Redwood Writers & 6thStreet Playhouse Play Festival

To listen to Lennie Dean, and Linda L. Reid, click onto the link:6th st playhouse santa rosa-1

Lennie Dean – 2012 Festival Director

Lennie Dean has been a veteran theatre participant in Sonoma County for forty years.  Her many capacities include director, actor, teacher, producer, education director and dramaturgy.  She co-founded and served as artistic director for the Marquee Theatre and Studio Be Theatre. She has also contributed her talents to Actors’ Theatre, Cinnabar Theatre, Santa Rosa Players, Summer Repertory Theatre, and Academy of Arts in San Francisco. In 1999 Lennie received the Independent Eye award for her contributions to Sonoma County theatre. In 2011 she directed BUG by Tracey Letts at the Narrow Way Stage Company for which she was named second on David Templeton’s Top Ten Torn Tickets of 2011. This past March 2012, Lennie directed and co-created The Tennessee Menagerie. That same month she was the Program Events director for a successful Women’s History Month at 6th Street Playhouse. She currently teaches acting classes at the 6th Street Playhouse.

Linda L. Reid has directed over 28 years for various community theater groups, including 6th Street Playhouse in Santa Rosa and Novato Theater Company.  Reid directed and re-designed My Left Breast from a monologue to a three-person show; presented in Sonoma, Napa, Ukiah, and Santa Rosa. She recently directed The Ticking Clock for 6th Street Playhouse

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March 17, 2012

Arts in the Valley, Saturday, March 3, 8pm, Sunday, 4, 2pm, 1480 KYOS AM, Merced, CA

by arthouseflower

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Tune into Arts in the Valley on Sat., March 3, and Sunday, March 4, host Kim McMillon will interview journalist William Wong on Linsanity, MamaKoatl in celebration of  International Women’s Month, and  Staci Santa, and Joey Essig about the Merced Arts Council.

To listen to author William Wong, click onto the link:linsanity

Journalist William Wong has created a series of articles on sports figure Jeremy Lin, and stereotypes that are placed on races.

Check out his articles at:  http://blog.sfgate.com/wwong/2012/02/25/linsanity-5-confirming-stereotypes

William Wong is an author, and oral historian who was born and grew up in Oakland, California’s Chinatown, the son of immigrants from China. His books include Yellow Journalist: Dispatches from Asian America and Images of America: Oakland’s Chinatown. He has written for the Wall Street Journal, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Examiner, the Oakland Tribune, East Bay Express, East-West, Asian Week, Filipinas Magazine, and salon.com. He has also been a regional commentator for The News Hour with Jim Lehrer on PBS and a political commentator on KQED-FM and KPFA-FM.

A Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines in the 1960s, he has traveled widely. He enjoys walking, tai chi, qigong, yoga, cooking, watching sports, going to the movies, watching TV dramas and PBS news shows, and having stimulating conversations about politics, culture, sports, racial and ethnic identity, and history. His oral history project focuses on Oakland Chinatown elders

 

Click onto the link to listen to MamaKoatl:mama kwat-1

MamaKoatl is a San Francisco-based Poet, Songstress, Kurandera and ARTivist. Her song and poetry are invitations to healing our earth, to renewing our human spirit. Her debut album Border Crossing Diosa is a historical document of poetry, prayer and protest. Mamakoatl began singing and playing the guitar in high school in Mexico.

 

Click onto the link to listen to Staci Santa and Joey Essig:merced arts

Staci Santa, the Executive Director of the Merced Arts Council, and Joey Essig, the operations director for the Arts Center discuss the Council’s Casino Royale fundraiser, and their hunt for a new Executive Director.

Incorporated in 1978, the Merced County Arts Council serves to provide the synergy of education, place and voice to inspire and nurture the arts with particular emphasis towards ARTREE, an award winning artists in schools and communities program.
The Merced County Arts Council’s administration of the Multicultural Arts Center and community programs are funded in part by matched public monies, private corporation grants, local memberships and donations from businesses, individuals and service organizations.

June 10, 2011

Arts in the Valley, Saturday, June 11, 2011, 8 PM, 1480 KYOS in Merced

by arthouseflower

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To listen to the program, please click on the link:SAV1-9
Are you interested in making a difference by supporting arts programming in Merced? Then tune into Arts in the Valley on Saturday, June 11th at 8 PM to hear the Executive Director of the Merced Arts Council Staci Santa, and co-owner of J & R Tacos Janna Rodriguez discuss Arts 24.

Arts 24 will take place at 645 West Main Street, From Friday, June 10th at 6 PM through Saturday, June 11 at 6 PM. Merced’s arts community is calling upon every person in Merced, and the outlining communities to help raise $12,000 in 24 hours for the Arts Council. This is not a wish list. The Merced Arts Council is in financial need. Staci Santa wants donors to know that whether you have $2 or $2,000 to spare, it doesn’t matter. Every dollar counts to ensuring that Merced keeps the doors of Merced’s Multi-Cultural Center open to the public. For more information about the fundraiser, visit http://www.artsmerced.org.

Arts 24
24 hours to raise $12,000 for the Arts Council

…what will you do?

Friday, June 10 6pm through Saturday June 11 6pm

The Merced County Arts Council is raising at least $12,000 in 24 hours, to support the Arts Center. Sounds like a big goal? It is. With your help, we know we can achieve it. Here’s how you can be a part of the most successful fundraiser ever.

1. Claim only one hour between 6/10 at 6pm and 6/11 at 6pm as yours. Act fast—time slots are going quickly!

2. Host an activity or sale to raise donations for the Arts Council. Ideas/suggestions on back.

3. Guarantee at least a $500 contribution from your hour. If your activity or sale does not raise at least $500, you (or your business) commit to making a donation to make up the difference. For example, if your business only sells $425 worth of tacos, you will write a check for $75, to total the $500 minimum.

4. Advertise your hour to your constituents. This step is key to the success of the entire 24 hours.

5. Promote the future hours’ activities and sales to your participants during your hour. We’ll provide a list of each hour’s sponsor.

6. Tally your donations at the end of your hour and call in your results to the Arts Council. Donations do not need to be delivered that day; we will make arrangements with each sponsor separately, for your most convenient time.

Each sponsor will receive:

Advertisement in local media outlets before the event;
Recognition on all event posters and promotional material, at least 2 weeks before the event;
Printed thank you from the Arts Council in the following issue of the Downtown Life Magazine, which will include each sponsor’s total donation;
200 postcards promoting your particular hour;
Credit card slips to accept Visa/MasterCard donations on-site (cash and checks made out to MCAC also accepted);
Donation receipts for on-site donors.

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To listen to Tony Slaton & Nailah Hubbard discuss the Boys & Girls Clubs of Merced, click onto this link:Arts in the Valley
Just as important as the arts are Merced’s youth. The Merced Boys & Girls Club has been nurturing and supporting young people through programming that teaches leadership, social, and educational skill.

Tony Slaton, a former professional football player for the LA Rams, has used that same energy and drive to build a program that is open to children and volunteers, and supports the young people of Merced. Beginning June 13th summer camps will be offered to interested youth. To find out more about the Boys & Girls Clubs’ summer programming, call (209) 722-9922.

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To listen to Eileen Vidales interview, click onto the link:Eileen Vidales
Health Educator Eileen Vidales returns to Arts in the Valley to discuss her Thursday afternoon walking program, and free yoga afterwards. I spent the afternoon walking and doing yoga with Eileen. This program is a wonderful opportunity to educate yourself about health and fitness.

Afternoon Delight Walking Group 
is a new mid-day walking group in Merced, CA.
 They meet on Thursdays, from 12:30-1:00pm at Bob Hart Square in Downtown Merced. The group has an option at 1:00 to walk back to Pilates Plus for a core workout with Armando or they can join Eileen Vidales for a free 30 minute beginner yoga class in the Sam Pipes room at the Civic Center.

Eileen is currently working in her studio on Main St, doing Yoga classes at the City of Merced during lunchtime, and working with 40 students at Snelling schools for an hour and a half class once a week.

For more information about Arts in the Valley, contact Kim McMillon at kimmac@pacbell.net.

December 12, 2010

December 11th Arts in the Valley, 1480 KYOS, 8 PM, PST

by arthouseflower

ARTSINVAL1211 Click onto this link to hear the December 11th Arts in the Valley

Staci Santa is the Executive Director of the Merced Arts Council, whose mission is to inspire and nurture the arts in Merced County. Incorporated in 1978, the Merced County Arts Council was originally operated from a small office space on Main Street. In 1996, the City of Merced entrusted the Arts Council to manage the Merced Multicultural Arts Center. In addition to operating this 28,000 sq. foot, multipurpose arts center, the Arts Council manages an arts-in-education program; an arts facility for adults with developmental disabilities; performances and visual/performing arts classes for children and adults; professional support for artists through fiscal sponsorship; exhibits of about 20 professional artists each year; and newfound coalitions for visual and performing artists.

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Francisco X. Alarcon, award winning Chicano poet and educator, is author of  twelve volumes of  poetry, including, From the Other Side of Night: Selected and New Poems (University of Arizona Press 2002), and Snake Poems: An Aztec Invocation (Chronicle Books 1992).

His  latest book is  Ce-Uno-One: Poems for the New Sun (Swan Scythe Press 2010). His book of  bilingual poetry for children, Animal Poems of the Iguazu (Children’s Book Press 2008), was selected as a Notable Book for a Global Society by the International Reading Association. His previous bilingual book  titled Poems to Dream Together (Lee & Low Books 2005) was awarded the 2006 Jane Addams Honor Book Award. He has been a finalist nominated for Poet Laureate of  California in two  occasions. He teaches at the University of California, Davis.

Whenever I say ‘Mexico’/I hear my grandma telling me/about the Aztecs and the city they built/on an island in the middle of a lake/’Mexico’ says my grandma/”means: from the bellybutton of the moon”/”don’t forget your origins my son”/maybe that’s why/whenever I now say “Mexico”/I feel like touching my bellybutton.

—Francisco Alarcon, Bellybutton of the Moon

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In 1990, Lucha Corpi was twice honored: she was awarded a Creative Arts Fellowship in fiction by the City of Oakland, and she was named poet laureate at Indian University Northwest.

The publication of Eulogy for a Brown Angel: A Mystery Novel (Arte Público Press, 1992) was the culmination of a life-long dream. The novel won the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award and the Multicultural Publishers Exchange Best Book of Fiction. Cactus Blood (Arte Público Press, 1995) is Corpi’s second mystery novel featuring Chicana detective Gloria Damasco. Hispanic culture, the United Farm Workers movement and other social issues texture a suspenseful search for a ritualistic assassin. The publication of Black Widow’s Wardrobe (Arte Público Press, 1999) rounded out the trilogy known as The Gloria Damasco Series.

“We Chicanos are like the abandoned children of divorced cultures. We are forever longing to be loved by an absent neglectful parent –Mexico-and also to be truly accepted by the other parent –the United States. We want bicultural harmony. We need it to survive. We struggle to achieve it. That struggle keeps us alive.”-Black Widow’s Wardrobe

 

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